Radial Tunnel Syndrome

Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med. 2021 Apr 23. doi: 10.1007/s12178-021-09703-w. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Radial tunnel syndrome is defined as a compressive neuropathy of the posterior interosseus nerve. It is differentiated from posterior interosseus nerve compression by symptom profile. The purpose of this article is to review past and current literature on the topic and determine if there are any emerging treatment options for this condition.

RECENT FINDINGS: Traditionally, conservative management of Radial Tunnel syndrome has been relatively unsuccessful. As a result, patients afflicted by this neuropathy require operative intervention. Effectiveness of surgical decompression is variable and can range from 67 to 92% but currently remains the standard treatment. However, there are some conservative treatment options that have been recently reported that show promising results. Such treatments include dry needling of the affected area and ultrasound guided corticosteroid injections to hydro dissect around the posterior interosseus nerve at sites of compression. Radial tunnel syndrome is an uncommon and unique peripheral neuropathy. It involves the posterior interosseus nerve however it can be differentiated from PIN syndrome based on the symptom profile. There are various compressive etiologies that can cause a patient to become symptomatic; therefore it is important to critically assess the patient and their symptoms and use appropriate imaging to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. Typically, conservative treatments are attempted first. Traditionally, conservative therapy is unsuccessful and operative decompression is necessary. However, current literature highlights various new nonsurgical options that suggest some promise and could be alternatives to surgical decompression.

PMID:33890229 | DOI:10.1007/s12178-021-09703-w

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