Professional football players at risk for non-acute groin injuries during the first half of the season: A prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

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Professional football players at risk for non-acute groin injuries during the first half of the season: A prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2017 Sep 15;:

Authors: Gouttebarge V, Veenstra E, Goedegebuure S, Frings-Dresen M, Kuijer P

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the incidence, diagnostics, treatment, anatomical region and return to play of non-acute groin injuries among professional footballers in the Netherlands.
DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.
METHODS: Medical staff members of all Dutch professional football clubs, recording prospectively injury occurrence of all professional footballers in their clubs, were asked to fill in an injury form about time-loss (⩾ 8 days) non-acute groin injury over the 2012-2013 season.
RESULTS: A cohort of 410 players from 12 professional football clubs were included (response rate = 44%). The season incidence of non-acute groin injuries was nearly 7% (29 non-acute groin injuries). In 82% of all cases, the player suffered from non-acute groin injury in the first half of the season. The average time to return to play was 35 days, ranging from 8 to 84 days. The adductors were the most affected anatomical regions (82%), with the most frequent diagnosis being overuse of the adductors (36%), followed by adductor tendinopathy (18%). In addition to medical history and physical examination, ultrasound (50%) and MRI (32%) were the diagnostic methods most frequently mentioned. As well as physical therapy, treatment consisted mostly of manual therapy (96%) and dry needling (61%).
CONCLUSIONS: A professional club with a squad of 25 players can expect on average two non-acute groin injuries per season with an average time-loss of 35 days. Players are more at risk in the first half of the season. In Dutch professional football, ultrasound is commonly used to diagnose non-acute groin injury, while manual therapy is the most commonly applied treatment.

PMID: 28946513 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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