Outcome of Primary Probing for Simple Membraneous Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction in Children Older Than 4 Years.

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Outcome of Primary Probing for Simple Membraneous Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction in Children Older Than 4 Years.

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2020 Jan 01;57(1):44-47

Authors: Reynolds M, Lueder G

Abstract
PURPOSE: To report outcomes of nasolacrimal duct (NLD) probing in children 4 years and older with simple membranous NLD obstruction.
METHODS: The records of all patients 4 years and older with congenital NLD obstruction who underwent surgery from 1997 to 2015 at Washington University School of Medicine were retrospectively reviewed. Of 47 patients reviewed, 18 (38.3%) were found to have simple membranous obstructions and were included in this study. Simple membranous obstruction was present at the distal duct and was relieved with passage of the probes in all patients. Children with canalicular or diffuse distal NLD stenosis (as defined by a tight, gritty feeling or multiple obstructions when passing the probe through the bony portion of the NLD), trisomy 21, lacrimal trauma, or craniofacial abnormalities were excluded. A successful outcome was determined by resolution of epiphora and periocular crusting.
RESULTS: Eighteen patients with ages ranging from 4.1 to 10.6 years with simple membranous NLD obstruction were treated. Sixteen of 18 (88.9%) patients had good outcomes following NLD probing. Two patients had persistent symptoms that resolved following balloon dilation and stent placement.
CONCLUSIONS: This study found that the success rate of probing in older patients with simple membranous NLD obstruction was comparable to that of younger patients. NLD probing alone is a good treatment option for older children with simple membranous NLD obstruction. Additional procedures such as balloon catheter dilation or stent placement may not be necessary at the time of initial probing. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2020;57(1):44-47.].

PMID: 31972040 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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