IDN News Release

The Integrative Dry Needling (IDN) Institute is changing the name of their courses to better reflect our teaching approach of dry needling.

The Institute will continue to be called Integrative Dry Needling based on how we have integrated the research and clinical expertise of our predecessors into a comprehensive treatment system. The term dry needling can mean different things depending on your point of view, professional training and clinical model. That said we made a decision to change the name of our courses to more accurately reflect our specific teaching and conceptual paradigm.

The names for our courses are now:

1. Neurologic Dry Needling for Pain Management and Sports Rehabilitation

2. Advanced Neurologic Dry Needling for Pain Management and Performance Enhancement.

We do not believe the muscular system is the root cause of a patient’s pain or dysfunction. We see the actual muscle as merely an end organ controlled by the nervous system that carries out specific actions. It’s important to acknowledge that the muscle is a peripheral structure with various functions, of which, are controlled by a larger control system. Of course a muscle can become injured, have inflammation and be painful, particularly in acute situations. As time passes through the stages of injury and attempted healing, the pain experience and neuromuscular dysfunction becomes perpetuated by the nervous system. This pervasive process thus requires a stimulus, i.e. treatment, to break the cycle and activate the body’s healing mechanisms. This stimulus should be applied in such a way that it taps into both, peripheral and central system mechanisms to address the widespread inflammatory process.

We believe the peripheral nervous system is the key to understanding musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction as it provides a reliable platform for needle location. Neurologic Dry Needling systemically targets peripheral neurogenic sensitivity and it’s relation to the central nervous system. By addressing Inflammation, Inhibition and Irritation (the 3 I’s in our last paper) of the peripheral nerves we can directly affect the neuromusculoskeletal system symptomatically, segmentally and systemically. With the publishing of our 3rd textbook titled Dr. Ma’s Neurologic Dry Needling it made sense to rename our courses with our focus on the neurology of dry needling.