SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING ON PAIN AND DISABILITY IN SUBJECTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME.

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SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING ON PAIN AND DISABILITY IN SUBJECTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME.

Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2018 Jun;13(3):462-473

Authors: Sutlive TG, Golden A, King K, Morris WB, Morrison JE, Moore JH, Koppenhaver S

Abstract
Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a prevalent knee disorder. A novel yet increasingly popular treatment for PFPS is trigger point dry needling (DN).
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if DN is more effective at reducing pain and disability than a sham treatment in individuals with PFPS.
Study design: Randomized trial.
Materials/Methods: Sixty military health care beneficiaries (36 males) with a clinical diagnosis of PFPS were recruited and completed the study. Subjects underwent a standardized clinical examination and were randomized into a DN or sham treatment group. DN treatment consisted of insertion of an acupuncture-like needle into six sites in the quadriceps femoris muscles of the symptomatic lower extremity based on a palpation examination. The sham grouped received a simulated treatment with a sharp object and needle guide tube without puncturing the skin. Self-reports of pain, disability, and overall status were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 72 hours. Data were analyzed with separate 2×2 repeated measures analysis of variance, with independent variables being Group (DN vs. sham) and Time (pre-treatment vs. immediately post-treatment, and pre-treatment vs. 72 hours). The hypothesis of interest in each case was the Group*Time interaction. The alpha-level was set a priori to .05 using 2-tailed tests.
Results: Both groups exhibited a clinically meaningful reduction in pain based on numeric pain rating scale scores immediately post-treatment and at 72 hours, but there was no statistically significant difference between groups (p = 0.219, 0.310). There was no significant difference between groups for any other outcome measures.
Conclusion: These data suggest that DN treatment is not more effective than a sham DN treatment at reducing short-term pain and disability in individuals with PFPS when used as an isolated treatment approach.
Level of Evidence: 2.

PMID: 30038832 [PubMed]

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