Percutaneous Application of Galvanic Current in Rodents Reverses Signs of Myofascial Trigger Points.

Related Articles

Percutaneous Application of Galvanic Current in Rodents Reverses Signs of Myofascial Trigger Points.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2020;2020:4173218

Authors: Margalef R, Bosque M, Monclús P, Flores P, Minaya-Muñoz F, Valera-Garrido F, Santafé MM

Abstract
An increase in the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) at the motor endplate is directly related to the generation of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). In this study, percutaneous electric fields were applied to an animal model of MTrPs with high levels of spontaneous ACh release. All experiments were performed on Swiss mice and Sprague Dawley rats. For evaluating the spontaneous neurotransmission, intracellular recordings were performed, and the frequency of miniature endplate potentials was evaluated. Electromyographic recordings were also conducted to evaluate the endplate noise. Finally, the number and strength of local twitch responses (LTR) were evaluated using ultrasound recordings. The protocols used for the electric currents were 0.4 mA for five seconds and four repetitions (protocol 1), 1.5 mA for five seconds and three repetitions (protocol 2), and 3 mA for three seconds and three repetitions (protocol 3). After a subcutaneous injection of neostigmine (NTG), a great increase was observed in the frequency of mEPPs, together with an elevated endplate noise. Protocols 2 and 3 were the most effective. Protocol 3 could completely reverse the action of NTG at both three hours and 24 hours, respectively. The application of percutaneous currents produced both an increase in the number (144%) and in the speed (230% faster) of LTR compared with dry needling. In conclusion, higher doses of electrical current are more effective for decreasing MTrPs findings in an animal model.

PMID: 32565858 [PubMed]

Read original article at PubMed >