Effectiveness of Dry Needling versus Placebo on Gait Performance, Spasticity, Electromyographic Activity, Pain, Range-of-Movement and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

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Effectiveness of Dry Needling versus Placebo on Gait Performance, Spasticity, Electromyographic Activity, Pain, Range-of-Movement and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

Brain Sci. 2020 Dec 17;10(12):

Authors: Luque-Moreno C, Granja-Domínguez A, Moral-Munoz JA, Izquierdo-Ayuso G, Lucena-Anton D, Heredia-Rizo AM

Abstract
Dry needling (DN) is an emerging technique commonly used in neurological and musculoskeletal pain conditions, but there have been no previous studies in patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). This trial aims to assess the efficacy of deep DN, compared with sham placebo DN, on gait performance, spasticity level, pain, electromyographic activity, range-of-movement (ROM) and quality of life in pwMS. Forty adults with MS were randomly assigned to one study group. The DN group will undergo 2 sessions (once per week) using DN over the rectus femoris (RF) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles at the lower extremity with higher spasticity. The placebo group will receive the same protocol using a sham placebo needle (Dong Bang needle). Outcome measures will include gait performance, using the GaitRite® system, spasticity level with the Modified Ashworth Scale, superficial electromyographic activity of RF and GM, pain (pressure algometer), ROM (goniometer), and quality of life (Musiqol). This study is the first investigating the short-term effect of DN, compared with placebo, in pwMS, and taking into account the possible changes in the electromyographic activity of the lower limb. Therefore, the results may help to understand the suitability of using this technique in the clinical setting for this population. Trial registration: ACTRN12619000880145.

PMID: 33561042 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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