Effectiveness of Deep Dry Needling vs Ischemic Compression in the Latent Myofascial Trigger Points of the Shortened Triceps Surae from Triathletes on Ankle Dorsiflexion, Dynamic, and Static Plantar Pressure Distribution: A Clinical Trial.

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Effectiveness of Deep Dry Needling vs Ischemic Compression in the Latent Myofascial Trigger Points of the Shortened Triceps Surae from Triathletes on Ankle Dorsiflexion, Dynamic, and Static Plantar Pressure Distribution: A Clinical Trial.

Pain Med. 2019 Sep 10;:

Authors: Benito-de-Pedro M, Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo R, Elena Losa-Iglesias M, Rodríguez-Sanz D, López-López D, Palomo-López P, Mazoteras-Pardo V, Calvo-Lobo AC

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the immediate efficacy of a single session of deep dry needling (DDN) vs ischemic compression (ICT) in a latent myofascial trigger point (MTrP) of the shortened triceps surae from triathletes for ankle dorsiflexion and redistribution of plantar pressures and stability.
DESIGN: A randomized simple blind clinical trial (NCT03273985).
SETTING: An outpatient clinic.
SUBJECTS: Thirty-four triathletes with a latent MTrP in the shortened gastrocnemius.
METHODS: Triathletes were randomized to receive a single session of DDN (N = 17) or ICT (N = 17) in a latent MTrP of the shortened triceps surae. The primary outcome was ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) by a universal goniometer. Secondary objectives were distribution of dynamic and static plantar pressures by T-Plate platform pressure, with measurements both before and after five, 10, 15, 20, and 25 minutes of treatment.
RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) for ankle dorsiflexion ROM or dynamic and static plantar pressures between the experimental group treated with DDN and the control group treated with ICT before and after treatment.
CONCLUSIONS: DDN vs ICT carried out in latent MTrPs of the shortened gastrocnemius of triathletes did not present differences in terms of dorsiflexion ROM of the tibiofibular-talar joint or in static and dynamic plantar pressure changes before and immediately after treatment.

PMID: 31502640 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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