Dry needling in lateral epicondylitis: a prospective controlled study.

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Dry needling in lateral epicondylitis: a prospective controlled study.

Int Orthop. 2017 Aug 21;:

Authors: Uygur E, Aktaş B, Özkut A, Erinç S, Yilmazoglu EG

Abstract
PURPOSE: Lateral epicondylitis (LE), a common disease, especially in middle age, causes decreased productivity and economic losses. The first-line treatment for LE is conservative and consists of topical and oral anti-inflammatory drugs, ice application, and brace use. If the first-line treatment fails, second-line treatment modalities, which are generally invasive, are offered. Second-line therapeutic regimens include saline, corticosteroid, or platelet-rich plasma injections. Dry needling is relatively new. We hypothesized that dry needling would be at least as effective as first-line treatment for LE. We compared the outcomes of first-line treatment and dry needling.
METHODS: The study allocated 110 patients into groups using online randomization software. After completing the Patient-rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), patients in group I received dry needling, whereas those in group II received first-line treatment, consisting of ibuprofen 100 mg twice a day and a proximal forearm brace. The patients were evaluated after three weeks and six months.
RESULTS: The study ultimately analyzed 92 patients. Although both treatment methods were effective at three weeks, dry needling was significantly more effective than the first-line treatment at six months.
CONCLUSION: Because of the low complication rate, dry needling is a safe method, and it might be an effective treatment option for LE.

PMID: 28828509 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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