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Delayed Recovery after Nonoperative Treatment of an Avulsion Fracture of the Ischial Tuberosity in an Adolescent Gymnast with a History of Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Case Report

Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2022 Aug 1;17(5):941-944. doi: 10.26603/001c.37256. eCollection 2022.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Avulsion fracture of the ischial tuberosity is uncommon. Patients typically present with symptoms consistent with hamstring strain. The purpose of this case report is to describe an avulsion fracture of the ischial tuberosity and subsequent recovery in an athlete with an endocrine disorder.

CASE DESCRIPTION: A 15-year-old United States of America Gymnastics level 9 gymnast presented with right hamstring pain after regular practice. She had been diagnosed with isolated growth hormone deficiency at age 4 and was treated with growth hormone replacement therapy until age 14. Six months before presentation, she experienced the insidious onset of dull, aching pain in her right hamstring, near the junction of the thigh and buttocks, that was believed to be the result of a chronic hamstring strain. The pain increased gradually over a year and was relieved with rest, massage, and dry needling. Two days before presentation, she felt a “snap” and pain while performing a switch leap during regular practice. She had sharp localized pain in the proximal hamstring with walking and sitting. She was diagnosed with a minimally displaced avulsion fracture of the ischial tuberosity.

OUTCOME: With nonoperative treatment, the fracture healed at three months, which is longer than the expected six weeks. Although return to sports is expected three months after this injury, it did not occur until six months in this patient. She was unable to participate in competitive level 9 gymnastics until 12 months after injury.

DISCUSSION: This case highlights that delayed recovery can occur after avulsion fracture of the ischial tuberosity in adolescent athletes with a history of growth hormone deficiency and treatment using growth hormone.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 5.

PMID:35949383 | PMC:PMC9340840 | DOI:10.26603/001c.37256

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